Sneak Peak Dinner Is Served


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Dinner is Served

Author's note

You'll notice in this book, as in all my cookbooks, that I use Pam. While I understand that it contains grain alcohol and propellant, I also understand that these burn off in the heat of cooking. I use it because it gets the job done better than another product I have ever used, including other cooking sprays. If, however, you prefer not to use it, by all mean, feel free to use an oil appropriate to the recipe.

You will notice that I rely heavily on soy as well. And much soy has genetically manipulated organisms (GMOs). However, it is very easy to buy soy products that have no GMOs in them. The lack of GMOs has become a bragging point listed point in bold print on labels, and these days, many good supermarket will carry non-GMO products.

Comment about Dinner Is Served

Dinner is Served is a wonderful cookbook appropriate for both the budding vegetarian and the vegan connoisseur. I've made several recipes in this book so far, and each was a big hit. Each was gone in a flash! If you're looking for a vegan cookbook full of healthy, delicious, and easy-to-make recipes, this is the one for you! I can't recommend it highly enough!
~Pam Strizek

Table of Contents

Breads

Carrot Muffins
Uncheddar Chive Biscuits
Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits
Corn Muffins
Corn Tortillas
Date Oat Scones
English Muffins
Garlic Bagels
Baker's Dozen Garlic Uncheddar Dinner Rolls
Herbed Dinner Rolls
Kamut Garlic Sesame Flatbreads
Mushroom, Tomato, and Parmesan Bread

Desserts

Almond Cookies
Almond Carob Squares
Carrot Poppy Seed Cake
Flaky Pie Crust
Hot Cross Buns
Lemon Pudding
Lemon Tart
Oatmeal Soy Cookies
Orange Kitchen Cake
Pumpkin Marmalade Pie
Raspberry Pecan Crunch

Dips and Dressings and Uncheese and Sauces

Avocado Salsa
Classic Basil Pesto
Cranberry Cilantro VInaigrette
Garam Masala
Grapefruit Tarragon Salad Dressing
Italian Seasoning
Lemony Dressing
Vegan Unmayonnaise
Mushroom Gravy
Orange Syrup
Red Bean Sauce
Salsa
Seasoned Flour
Spinach Pesto Dip
Creamy Tofu Topping
Tofu Cream Uncheese
Tofu Sour Uncream
Spiced Tofu Topping
Sundried Tomato and Basil Pesto

Oven Dishes

Eggless Asparagus Frittata
Cheesy Macaroni, Unbacon, and Spinach
Broccoli Unbacon Quiche
Cabbage and Broccoli Pie
Scalloped Carrots and Uncheese
Dilly, Lemony Asparagus with Almonds
Lemon Curry Tofu
Stuffed Portabellas
Whipped Potato Casserole
Potato Cauliflower Pie
Unsausage Stuffed Portabellas
Eggless Spinach Artichoke Frittata
Veggie Stuffed Peppers

Salads

Arugula, Bean, and Pasta Salad
Avocado Cucumber Salad
Carrot Salad with Turnip Greens
Unchicken Salad with Apples and Hazelnuts
Citrus and Mango Salad
Edamame Salad
Festive Luncheon Salad
Fruit, Nut, and Turnip Green Salad
Green Bean Salad
Minted Mango Raspberry Salad
Minty Cucumber Salad
Pesto Pasta Salad
Spinach Strawberry Salad

Side Dishes

Asparagus with Herb Pesto
Asparagus with Herbed Sauce
Broccoli and Brussels Sprouts with Unbacon
Broccoli, Tomatoes, and Mushrooms
Celery with Peppers and Unbacon
Devilish Corn and Edamame
Lemony Broccoli and Pepper
Cheesy Kale
Millet Pilaf
Drunken Mushrooms
Herbed Peas and Kale
Pimiento Green Beans
Potato and Zucchini Pancakes
Cheesy Potatoes and Peas
Quinoa Pilaf
Tomatoes and Basil Mediterranean

Soups and Stews

Artichoke Soup
Rob's Baseball Soup
Black Bean Soup
Black Bean and Corn Stew
Broccoli and Mushroom Potage
Carrot Sweet Potato Soup
Corn Bisque
A Dilly of a Vegetable Soup
White Grape Gazpacho
Lentil Soup
New Year's Eve Soup
Seaweed, Mushroom, and Bok Choy Soup
Spring Soup
Snowy Day Tomato Soup

Stovetop Dishes

Broccoli with "Kielbasa" and Pasta
Canadian Unbacon Spaghetti
Unchicken Grillers with Walnuts and Chive Sauce
Chiocciole with Veggies and Ramona Sauce
Fruited Tofu with Barley
Fusilli with Mustard Greens
The Garden over Rice
Grillers with Herbs and Capers
Mushroom Tacos
Pasta with Broccoli and Cauliflower
Rotelle Mediterranean
Seitan Kabobs
Spaghetti with Tomatoes and Minted Pesto
Tofu Patties with Vegetables
Tofu Steaks with Pesto and Sour Uncream Sauce
Tortilla Skillet
Vegetable Paella

Glossary

Bibliography

About the Author

Other Books by Vila SpiderHawk

Sneak Peek

Breads

Carrot Muffins

Yield: 12 muffins
  • 3 cups whole-wheat flour
  • 3/4 cup ground flaxseeds (use a coffee grinder)
  • 1/2 cup Sucanat or brown sugar
  • 2 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 2 tsp. aluminum-free baking soda
  • 3 eggs or egg replacer equivalent to 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup almond oil
  • 1/3 cup prune puree (use baby food as long as it does not contain fillers or thickeners)
  • 1/4 cup soymilk
  • 2 cups grated carrots
  • 1 cup minced fresh pineapple
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • Pam
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine first 5 ingredients in a large bowl. Stir together egg replacer and next 4 ingredients in a small bowl. Beat into flour mixture until very well combined. Stir in carrots, pineapple, and raisins. Spray a muffin pan with Pam. Spoon batter into muffin cups. Bake 40 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

Carrots contain every mineral the human body needs, including calcium, iron, and magnesium, which are blood builders. They are a great source of beta-carotene, a proven cancer fighter, and vitamin A. They're good for liver disease, night blindness, cancer, reducing cholesterol, cleaning the blood, skin problems, flushing out fat, and lupus.
- Healing Juices by L.A. Justice, p 86

Ellagic acid, particularly effective against esophageal and lung cancers, is a flavonoid found in most berries and beets, but it is especially abundant in strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, cranberries, pomegranates, grapes, and walnuts. All of grapes' nutrients are concentrated in raisins because of the lack of water.
- Eat to Heal by Kristine M. Napier, M.P.H., R. D, L.D., p 143

Among other health benefits, the lignans in flaxseeds contain a substance--platelet activating factor (PAF)-receptor antagonists--which prevent tiny blood clots from forming in the blood. Such tiny clots can damage and clog the tiny blood vessels of the kidneys, thereby reducing the life-giving blood supply and ultimately causing kidney damage. It's also possible that the alpha-linolenic acid (and omoega-3 fatty acid) in flaxseeds plays some role in reducing inflammation.
- Eat to Heal by Kristine M. Napier, M.P.H., R. D, L.D., p 73

Pineapple offers thiamin for your heart, nerve health, and metabolism; manganese for strong bones, energy, and nerve health; and selenium for heart health, healthy skin, and reproductive health.
- Healing Foods for Dummies by Molly Siple, M.S., R.D., pp 47, 49, 50

Uncheddar Chive Biscuits

Yield: 9-10 biscuits
  • 1 TBS lemon juice plus soymilk to make 1 cup
  • 1 cup ground flaxseeds
  • 1 cup ground oats
  • 2 cups whole-wheat flour
  • 1 cup soy flour
  • 1 TBS aluminum-free baking powder
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 cup shredded soy "cheddar" (Galaxy Foods makes a good one)
  • 1 cup finely chopped fresh chives
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Stir together lemon juice and soymilk in a cup. Set aside. Stir together flaxseeds and next 7 ingredients in a large bowl until well combined. Stir in oil and lemon milk just until uniformly moist. Turn onto a floured surface. Pat into a disk about 3/4" thick. Using the rim of a water tumbler, cut biscuits, patting together leftover dough to make as many as possible. Arrange on an ungreased baking sheet so they do not touch. Bake 15 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

Eating oats regularly may reduce insulin resistance and help stabilize blood sugar. The fiber in oats also lowers blood cholesterol levels and thus reduces your risk of heart disease.
- Outsmart Diabetes, Cindi Caciolo, Editor, p 21

Eat more fiber. Most people don't get enough fiber. The recommended daily intake is around 25 to 35 g. You can get fiber from whole grain breads and cereals, whole fruit, vegetables, and dried beans and peas.
- Outsmart Diabetes, Cindi Caciolo, Editor p 9

Dr. Lilian Thompson from the University of Toronto has provided the most compelling early proof that cancer can be reversed. Her work is just now being prepared for publication. What she has found is that breast cancer size actually decreases with a daily course of flaxseed. Flaxseed is quickly becoming one of the most popular health foods in America and has been called the most remarkable healing foods of our time. Flaxseed has two critical parts, flax oil, one of the healthiest fats you can eat, and a special fiber that protects against breast cancer and heart disease. This breakthrough study shows that breast cancer size decreases in the short time between the diagnosis of breast cancer and surgery. That phenomenon is uncommonly seen with very powerful chemotherapy.
- The Breast Cancer Prevention Diet by Dr. Bob Arnot, p 8

Along with their cousins garlic, leeks, and onions, chives help prevent cancer and treat high blood pressure.
- The Green Pharmacy by James A, Duke, Ph.D., p 16

Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits

Yield: about 8 biscuits
  • 1 TBS lemon juice plus soymilk to make 1 cup
  • 1 cup ground flaxseeds
  • 1 cup ground oats
  • 1+3/4 cups whole-wheat flour
  • 1 TBS aluminum-free baking powder
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup almond or canola oil
  • Pam
Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Let lemon milk sit for 5-10 minutes. Meanwhile stir together ground flaxseeds and next 5 ingredients in a large bowl. Stir in lemon milk and oil. Knead once or twice. On a lightly floured surface pat the dough into a 3/4" thick disk. Cut biscuits with the rim of a water tumbler, patting together leftover dough to make as many biscuits as possible. Spray a baking sheet with Pam. Arrange biscuits on sheet. Bake 15 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

There are a number of spices that research shows can help the body use insulin more efficiently. These include bay leaf, cinnamon, cloves, and turmeric. You might also want to think about coriander and cumin. The research is not as strong on these two spices, but in animal studies both have shown to lower blood sugar somewhat.
- The Green Pharmacy by James A. Duke, Ph.D., pp 202-203

Whole wheat is a great source of B vitamins, which are important for liver function and the health of the nervous system; vitamin E, a potent antioxidant that also promotes heart health; magnesium, which helps sustain a healthy heartbeat; zinc, which provides energy; fiber, which facilitates healthy bowel function; essential fatty acids, which transport oxygen to the cells; and more than 16 other major and trace minerals that are involved in all sorts of activities throughout the body. When flour is made from whole wheat, all these nutrients remain in the final product. But when whole wheat is refined to make white flour, the germ and bran are removed (the wheat is also bleached to make it white). Four that is missing the germ and the bran is also missing vitamins, minerals, and fiber.
- Healing Foods for Dummies by Molly Siple, M.S., R.D., pp 28-29

Raisins are a good source of thiamin for heart health and a healthy metabolism; of chromium to control blood sugar, for heart health, and for energy; of copper for healthy blood and energy; of iron for healthy blood and a healthy metabolism and energy; of phosphorus for strong bones and muscles and for energy; and of potassium for healthy heart, kidneys and nerves.
- Healing Foods for Dummies by Molly Siple, M.S., R.D., pp 47, 48, 49

Corn Muffins

Yield: 18 muffins
  • 1/2 cup ground flaxseeds (use a coffee grinder)
  • 1/2 cup ground oats
  • 1+1/3 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1+1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 1 TBS aluminum-free baking powder
  • 1 egg or egg replacer equivalent to 1 egg
  • 1 recipe Tofu Sour Uncream
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup soymilk
  • 3 TBS olive oil
  • 1 cup cream style corn
  • Pam
Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Stir together first 5 ingredients in a large bowl. Process egg replacer and next 4 ingredients in a blender until very smooth. Stir into flour mixture just until uniformly moist. Stir in cream style corn. Spray muffin wells with Pam. Spoon batter into wells. Bake 30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

Because corn is very high in fiber, it can help lower cholesterol. And because it's very high in carbohydrates, it provides quick energy while delivering virtually no fat. Corn is an excellent basic food source. When combined with other vegetables in the diet, it is a good source of protein, carbohydrates, and vitamins.
- New Foods for Healing by Selene Yeager, p 214

Flaxseeds contain glyosides, gum, linamarin, linoleic acid, mucilage, oleic acid, protein, saturated acids, tannins, and wax. They are good for female disorders, colon problems, inflammation, and tumors. They promote strong nails, bones, and teeth as well as healthy skin.
- Prescription for Nutritional Healing by James F. Balch, M.D. and Phyllis A. Balch, C.N.C, p 52

All soybean products such as tofu and soybean milk are complete proteins. The availability of foods that offer complete proteins when eaten alone is limited. Soybeans, however, contain the essential amino acids plus several other nutrients and are used to complement the meatless diet.
- Prescription for Nutritional Healing by James F. Balch, M.D. and Phyllis A. Balch, C.N.C, p 13

The American Diabetes Association recommends a diet including 40 grams of fiber a day, especially soluble fiber, and the National Cancer Institute recommends incorporating 30 grams if fiber into the daily diet. However, the modern diet contains only one-third the recommended intake. Americans average only 12-15 grams a day. Yet fiber is surprisingly easy to incorporate into your diet. For instance, one slice of whole-grain bread has about 4 grams of fiber, nearly 15 percent of the recommended daily amount.
- Meals that Heal by Lisa Turner, p 44

Corn Tortillas

  • 1/2 cup ground flaxseeds
  • 1/2 cup ground oats
  • 2 cups yellow cornmeal
  • 2 cups whole-wheat flour
  • 2 TBS olive oil
  • 1 cup hot water
Stir together dry ingredients in a large bowl. Drizzle oil over flour mixture and stir. Stir in water. Knead, adding a little water if needed to make a smooth dough. Shape into baseball-size balls. Roll balls thinner than a pie crust, separating uncooked tortillas with sheets of wax paper. Heat a dry iron skillet (or other heavy skillet) over medium-high heat. Sprinkle with a few drops of water. If they dance, the skillet is hot enough. Cook tortillas until golden brown. If using them as wraps, cook on one side only. For crispy tortillas, cook on both sides.

Return to Table of Contents Cornmeal is an excellent source of both vitamin E and zinc. Vitamin E aids in preventing cataracts, improves athletic performance, and helps diminish leg cramps. Vitamin E prevents cell damage by inhibiting lipid peroxidation and the formation of free radicals. It retards aging and may prevent age spots as well. The body needs zinc to maintain proper levels of vitamin E in the body.
- Prescription for Nutritional Healing by James F. Balch, MD and Phyllis A Balch, CNC, p 9

The body contains two classes of fatty acids, the omega-3s and the omega-6s. Omega 6s are found in most vegetable oils and many processed foods, as well as in animals that eat feed sources high in omega-6s. Omega-3s are found in fish oils, marine algae, and in flaxseed and flaxseed oil. While maintaining a balance of these fatty acids is important, the modern diet has upset this balance by drastically reducing the amounts of omega-3s and increasing the amounts of omega-6s. Omega-3s produce an anti-inflammatory response and have been reported to successfully decrease arthritis pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Omega-3s also produce a lowering of triglyceride levels and make platelets less stick and less likely to form clots. Flaxseed is a good source of omega-3 fatty acids.
- Natural Remedies for a Healthy Heart by David Heber, M.D., Ph. D, p 145

Whole wheat is a great source of B vitamins, which are important for liver function and the health of the nervous system; vitamin E, a potent antioxidant that also promotes heart health; magnesium, which helps sustain a steady heartbeat; zinc, which provides energy; fiber, which facilitates healthy bowel function; essential fatty acids, which transport oxygen to the calls; and more than 16 other major and trace minerals that are involved in all sorts of activities throughout the body.
- Healing Foods for Dummies by Molly Siple, M.S., R.D., p 28

Oat beta-glucans helps reduce cholesterol because its soluble fiber absorbs water, forming a thick gel in the digestive system. Not only does this gel provide a more lasting feeling of fullness, which helps curb overall calorie intake, it traps the cholesterol found in food and carries such dietary cholesterol out of the body. In the same way, oat beta glucans help mop up some of the bile that your body pours into the intestines to digest fat. The liver uses cholesterol taken from the bloodstream to create bile, so this action helps to reduce cholesterol levels.
- Energy Times, Allan Richter, Editor, February, 2009. p 52

Date Oat Scones

Yield: 8 scones
  • 1 TBS lemon juice plus soymilk to make 3/4 cup
  • 2+1/2 cups whole-wheat flour
  • 1 cup quick oats
  • 1/2 cup ground flaxseeds (use a coffee grinder)
  • 1 TBS aluminum-free baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 6 TBS almond oil
  • 1 egg or egg replacer equivalent to 1 egg
  • 3 TBS honey
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup chopped dried dates
  • Pam
Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Let lemon milk sit at least 5 minutes. Stir together flour and next 4 ingredients in a medium bowl. Process lemon milk, oil, and next 3 ingredients in a blender until smooth. Stir into flour mixture just until uniformly moist. Stir in dates. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead 1 minute. Pat into a circle about 1" thick. Cut into 8 wedges. Spray a baking sheet with Pam. Arrange wedges on baking sheet so they do not touch. Bake 15-18 minutes or until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean.

High-soluble-fiber grains, such as oats can help control cholesterol, although diet works best on people who need the help the most--those with the highest LDL and the lowest HDL. Also important is to eat lots of fruits and vegetables that are high in the antioxidants vitamins A and E and beta-carotene. They keep LDL cholesterol safe from toxic changes that threaten arteries and promote heart attacks.
- Food--Your Miracle Medicine by Jean Carper, pp 68-69

Whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and beans are very low in fat and high in complex carbohydrates, which boost your metabolism and improve your ability to burn calories. The result is weight control that is easier than any diet and, best of all, permanent.
- The Compassionate Cook, Ingrid Newkirk, Editor, p 2

Dates are high in natural aspirin and have a laxative effect. Dried fruits, including dates, are linked to lower rates of certain cancers, especially pancreatic cancer.
- Food--Your Miracle Medicine by Jean Carper, p 479

English Muffins

Yield: 18-20 muffins
  • 1 package active dry yeast
  • 1 cup warm water (115 degrees)
  • 2 TBS honey
  • 1/2 lb. firm regular tofu, drained
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 3 TBS canola oil
  • 5 cups whole-wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup ground flaxseeds (use a coffee grinder)
  • Pam
  • Cornmeal
Stir together first 3 ingredients in a large bowl. Let stand 10 minutes or until foamy. If mixture fails to foam, discard and begin again. Process tofu, water and oil in a blender until smooth. Pour into yeast mixture. Stir in 3+1/2 cups flour until smooth. Stir in 1+1/2 cups more flour and ground flaxseeds. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead 5 minutes. Spray a large bowl with Pam. Place dough in bowl, turning once to coat both sides. Cover with a clean damp cloth and let rise in a warm place 1 hour or until doubled in size. Punch down. Divide dough in half. Generously sprinkle work surface with cornmeal. Roll each half of dough to a circle about 1/2" thick. Cut into smaller circles with the rim of a water tumbler. Sprinkle a baking sheet with cornmeal. Arrange muffins on sheet so they do not touch. Cover with a clean, damp cloth and let rise in a warm place 10 minutes. Heat a dry skillet over low heat. Cook muffins on skillet for 5-8 minutes per side.

Flaxseeds contain a compound called alpha-linolenic acid that has been shown to reduce levels of prostaglandins, chemicals in the body that contribute to inflammation. They also contain compounds called lignan precursors that have antioxidant properties that can block the effects of free radicals. This is important because free radicals are produced in large amounts whenever there's inflammation, and unless they are stopped, they make inflammation even worse. Some evidence suggests that getting about 3 tablespoons of ground flaxseed or 1 to 3 tablespoons of flaxseed oil might be enough to ease the symptoms.
- Prevention 1001 Best Health Tips, Doug Hill, Editor, pp 79-80

Vitamin E is a powerhouse antioxidant. It not only blocks free radicals but also fends off cancer by stimulating the immune system. Plus, it actually prevents the formation of cancer-causing compounds in the body. Find vitamin E in wheat germ, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds.
- Prevention 1001 Best Health Tips, Doug Hill, Editor, pp 77

Honey contains traces of B vitamins, folate, iron, and manganese in addition to 181 different bioactive compounds such as quercetin and caffeic acid, which boost energy production in the brain.
- Prevention January 2012, David Zinczenko, Editorial Director, p 59


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